Media Mindfulness: Autograph captures 5,500 Bits Of Data About You in 30 seconds

See on Scoop.itMedia Mindfulness

“Describing it as a “game-changer,” Ogilvy Labs today announced a deal to begin using a new mobile-based technology enabling brands to quickly and simply develop incredibly intricate profiles for targeting consumers. The technology, dubbed Autograph, utilizes a simple flashcard-style interface that captures 5,500 attributes about a consumer in about 30 seconds.”

Antonio Lopez‘s insight:

This technology strikes me as a voluntary kind of totalitarianism. Click the headline to read the whole story.

See on www.mediapost.com

Media Mindfulness: How PBS is becoming the Plutocratic Broadcasting Service

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Just a few hours after anti-pension billionaire John Arnold responded to Pando’s exclusive story about media corruption, public broadcasting officials have now issued their own response – and like …

Antonio Lopez‘s insight:

So this is what happens as a byproduct of neoliberal policies: defund public media and open the door to private interests that invariably influence content. Click the headline to read the story.

See on pando.com

Stop Beating a Dead Fox

See on Scoop.itMedia Mindfulness

The conservative news channel’s only real power is in riling up liberals, who by this point should know better.

Antonio Lopez‘s insight:

A pithy analysis full of zingers (for example, comparing Fox prez Roger Aile’s obsession with blond anchors to Alfred Hitchcock’s use and abuse of lead women), this article ponders the unthinkable: Is Fox News really the big bad wolf that deserves the obsessiveness of the left? His answer is, no. With an average viewership age of 64, Fox, the article argues, is more isolated and out of touch with America as ever. Furthermore, it claims that during the news network’s tenure, the Democrats have been far more successful than the "good old days" of mainstream TV when Republicans dominated national elections. But this also ignores the damaging role it had in the post-9/11 era by propelling the Afgan and Iraq invasions.

 

The article concurs with feelings that I have long held: that Fox’s influence is overblown and that the attention the left gives it only makes it stronger. However, I think the network’s influence is underplayed in the article’s analysis. While it is true that Democrats are making gains in national elections and our demographics are going the opposite direction of Fox’s core audience, the network manages to influence the other news programs in how they cover the news and talk about the issues. Fox lowers the bar, so-to-speak, which is really evident with climate change coverage. Fox has done more damage to muddy this issue than on almost every other key point, and for that reason, Fox News remains very dangerous.

 

I do agree that people need to stop feeding the Fox troll, and to just deny attention to the likes of drag queen Ann Coulter and Bill Scrooge O’Reilly. They are contrarians who feed off of people’s ire, so let them be as Fox’s anti-pot, anti-gay Titanic sinks. Nonetheless, to say that Fox doesn’t set the news agenda would be naive and wrong. Fox still has the strategic role of spreading disinformation, and on this count it remains quite successful.

See on nymag.com

Bloomsbury – Technobiophilia

See on Scoop.itGreening the Media Ecosystem

Why are there so many nature metaphors – clouds, rivers, streams, viruses, and bugs – in the language of the internet? Why do we adorn our screens with exotic images of forests, waterfalls, animals and beaches? In Technobiophilia: Nature and Cyberspace, Sue Thomas interrogates the prevalence online of nature-derived metaphors and imagery and comes to a surprising conclusion. The root of this trend, she believes, lies in biophilia, defined by biologist E.O. Wilson as ‘the innate attraction to life and lifelike processes’. In this wide-ranging transdisciplinary study she explores the strong thread of biophilia which runs through our online lives, a phenomenon she calls ‘technobiophilia’, or, the ‘innate attraction to life and lifelike processes as they appear in technology’. The restorative qualities of biophilia can alleviate mental fatigue and enhance our capacity for directed attention, soothing our connected minds and easing our relationship with computers.

Technobiophilia: Nature and Cyberspace offers new insights on what is commonly known as ‘work-life balance’. It explores ways to make our peace with technology-induced anxiety and achieve a ‘tech-nature balance’ through practical experiments designed to enhance our digital lives indoors, outdoors, and online.

The book draws on a long history of literature on nature and technology and breaks new ground as the first to link the two. Its accessible style will attract the general reader, whilst the clear definition of key terms and concepts throughout should appeal to undergraduates and postgraduates of new media and communication studies, internet studies, environmental psychology, and human-computer interaction.

Antonio Lopez‘s insight:

I haven’t had a chance to read this book yet, but I’m very interested in the prevailance of nature metaphors to describe media. I look forward to checking it out.

See on www.bloomsbury.com